Book Collection Appointment

Manx Canine Cuisine makes one of the best raw complete and balanced dog foods on earth. As the Isle of Man is the only place on the planet that is registered as a Complete Biosphere Nation, the food raised and grown on our Island is incredibly healthy and nutritious, we use meat, vegetables, fruit and herbs grown by some of the best farmers in the world, who still use ethical and environmental practices that not only benefit us and our pets, but the land we live in too. 

mANX cANINE cUISINE

You can now order all your food and book your

collection slot in one place, everything is right here.

Click the button above and the 'OKAY' button

and just follow the instructions. 

Manx Fresh Nutrition to Thrive Not Just Survive

lamb bones

Opening Times

Monday 12:30 to 6:00 

(No Collections on Mondays) 

Tuesday 12:30 to 6:00

Wednesday 12:30 to 6:00

Thursday 12:30 to 6:00

Friday 1:30 to 4:00

Saturday 12:30 to 3:00

Sunday Closed

Delivery Schedule: 

East & North: Saturday

West & South: Friday

IMPORTANT NOTE:

These days and times may

change without notice,

do not leave ordering

till the last minute,

please ensure if you

are not in you have

a safe, secure and cool

place to leave your order.

 

Delivery dates will change if they fall on a Bank Holiday, they will be delivered on the previous day, please ensure you take this into account when ordering. 

Benefits of Giving Raw Bones

  • Raw bones clean teeth like no other chews in the world.

  • Raw bones can take a long time to chew and when your dog has eaten all the meat, the bone can last for weeks!

  • Raw Bones are rich with minerals such as calcium and phosphorus.

  • Raw Bones remove plaque naturally and helps to keep gums and teeth strong.

  • Chicken cartilage such as wing tips, feet, and carcasses are great for added glucosamine in your dog’s diet, perfect supplement for those painful joints, or just to keep them in great condition.

  • Meaty bones can be used as a meal replacement.

Raw Bones are a great mental stimulation and wonderful chew therapy for your dog or s teething puppy.

“Recreational Bones”: These bones can also be knuckles, shanks, or femurs that due to their shape and composition, provide hours of chewing action.

“Meal Replacement Bones”: Bones such as chicken, turkey or duck necks, Lamb necks, lamb and pork rib bones, chicken & duck wings, light none weight baring bones, they have lots of meat on so your dog’s get a tasty and stimulating meal too.

Benefits of Giving Raw Bones

  • Raw bones clean teeth like no other chews in the world.
  • Raw bones can take a long time to chew and when your dog has eaten all the meat, the bone can last for weeks!
  • Raw Bones are rich with minerals such as calcium and phosphorus.
  • Raw Bones remove plaque naturally and helps to keep gums and teeth strong.
  • Chicken cartilage such as wing tips, feet, and carcasses are great for added glucosamine in your dog’s diet, perfect supplement for those painful joints, or just to keep them in great condition.
  • Meaty bones can be used as a meal replacement.

Raw Bones are a great mental stimulation/chew therapy for your dog or puppy.

Types of Bones:  “Toothbrush Bones”: Bones such as knuckles (the knee bones), or ribs are best for cleaning teeth because of their shape and the meat on them acts like floss!

“Recreational Bones”: These bones can also be knuckles, shanks, or femurs that due to their shape and composition, provide hours of chewing action.

“Meal Replacement Bones”: Bones such as chicken, turkey or duck necks, Lamb necks, lamb and pork rib bones, chicken & duck wings, light none weight baring bones, they have lots of meat on so your dog’s get a tasty and stimulating meal too.

What to Watch Out For

  • Aggressive chewers should be given softer bones in case they over chew and grind their teeth down. Soft bones include knuckles, chicken bones, turkey necks, rib bones, and other small animal bones.
  • Remember to ALWAYS supervise your dog with a bone until you know what kind a chewer they are.

 

Dogs will attempt to hide their bones by burying them so that they ferment. This completely normal and healthy for your dog!

Choosing The Right Bone :

 

· Choose the right size bone for your dog: If you are not sure which size of bone to get for your dog, choose a much larger size to be safe.

 

First time bone chewers such as puppies should be taught how to eat a bone. Choose a stick shaped bone such as a chicken wing, or lamb ribs. Hold one end of the bone and let your dog chew on the other and pull away if it seems like your dog will try to swallow the whole thing! Through this process, much like a mother wolf might, you teach your dog how to patiently enjoy a bone.


Given enough time, your dog will eat the whole bone! If your dog eats too much bone however, their stools may come out chalky and hard or if the bone was too rich they may have loose stool. If you suspect they ate too much adding pumpkin to their meal will do the trick. To avoid eating too much bone, you can give it to them in several sittings so that they don’t eat the whole thing at once.

 

NO COOKED OR ROASTED BONES I can not stress this enough!

 

Cooked bones are dangerous as they become very hard and brittle which increases the likelihood of them breaking and splintering into sharp pieces. Cooked bones are also very difficult for dogs and cats to digest as the bones lose all of their nutritional value. Smoked Bones are also dangerous as they often have additives such as artificial flavouring and preservatives, so, the rule is, Raw, Raw, Raw and Raw.

 

Stomach Acidity PH Level

The gastric acidity (gastric PH) of the stomach of a dog or cat eating a diet predominantly made up of raw meat is very low (very acidic), with a PH of 1 or 2 (relative to the level of meat protein). This is it’s natural environment and changes with the amount of animal based protein i.e. Raw meat a dog gets, the more starches (plant based, grains, rice, potatoes etc) increases the PH gastric level to 4-5 or even higher, which is the reason so many dogs have sensitive stomachs, diarrhoea, vomiting, gastric obstructions etc. 

 

This highly acidic environment favours the breakdown of raw meats, and raw bones, into soft digestible material. The low PH also is highly effective at killing bacteria, particularly potentially pathogenic bacteria like salmonella spp, clostridia, campylobacter and E Coli. So the natural ‘wild” diet of dogs an cats has evolved a gastric environment that favours the breakdown of raw meats, raw bones, and a PH that kills potentially harmful bacteria, consistent with the requirements of carnivores, and in particular, the scavenging nature of dogs.

 

Digestive Tract

Also matched to this highly carnivorous diet (raw meat diet) is a very effective digestive process, which occurs in a short gastrointestinal tract. Dogs and cats have a significantly shorter GI tract compared to other non meat eating (herbivorous) animals, whereas man, as a natural omnivore has an intermediate length. The relative length of the gut reflects that nature of the diet, and how efficiently or slowly the food is broken down and absorbed.

 

Fresh raw meat is easily digested and absorbed compared to vegetable matter, and as such, carnivores have a short gut, and rapid gut transit time, fresh meat can be digested and processed in the carnivores body in as little as 8- 12 hrs, whereas plant and vegetable material in a herbivore’s gut can take 3-5 days to be processed.

 

What we see with the advent of processed pet foods, is a significant change in the general nature of ingredients in the diet. It is a simple commercial fact that meat protein is the most expensive component in any pet food, and as a result, there is always commercial pressure to keep meat protein levels to a minimum, thereby keeping costs down of the end product (and / or maximising profits).

 

Modern processed pet foods have adapted to these financial constraints firstly by significantly increasing the carbohydrate component of dog and cat foods – corn, wheat, rice, potato, pea fibre, beet fibre and other forms of carbohydrate are often the first and most major ingredient in many pet foods. Secondly, processed pet foods have also begun to substitute meat (animal) proteins with plant based proteins that are much cheaper – ingredients like Soya bean and lupins are cheap sources of protein that will increase the overall protein % on the label, but without the associated increase in cost. The problem with this type of substitution is that it does directly impact on the digestive environment of the dog or cat.

 

Benefits of Giving Raw Bones

  • Raw bones clean teeth like no other chews in the world.
  • Raw bones can take a long time to chew and when your dog has eaten all the meat, the bone can last for weeks!
  • Raw Bones are rich with minerals such as calcium and phosphorus.
  • Raw Bones remove plaque naturally and helps to keep gums and teeth strong.
  • Chicken cartilage such as wing tips, feet, and carcasses are great for added glucosamine in your dog’s diet, perfect supplement for those painful joints, or just to keep them in great condition.
  • Meaty bones can be used as a meal replacement.

Raw Bones are a great mental stimulation/chew therapy for your dog or puppy.

Types of Bones:  “Toothbrush Bones”: Bones such as knuckles (the knee bones), or ribs are best for cleaning teeth because of their shape and the meat on them acts like floss!

“Recreational Bones”: These bones can also be knuckles, shanks, or femurs that due to their shape and composition, provide hours of chewing action.

“Meal Replacement Bones”: Bones such as chicken, turkey or duck necks, Lamb necks, lamb and pork rib bones, chicken & duck wings, light none weight baring bones, they have lots of meat on so your dog’s get a tasty and stimulating meal too.

What to Watch Out For

  • Aggressive chewers should be given softer bones in case they over chew and grind their teeth down. Soft bones include knuckles, chicken bones, turkey necks, rib bones, and other small animal bones.
  • Remember to ALWAYS supervise your dog with a bone until you know what kind a chewer they are.

 

Dogs will attempt to hide their bones by burying them so that they ferment. This completely normal and healthy for your dog!

Choosing The Right Bone :

 

· Choose the right size bone for your dog: If you are not sure which size of bone to get for your dog, choose a much larger size to be safe.

 

First time bone chewers such as puppies should be taught how to eat a bone. Choose a stick shaped bone such as a chicken wing, or lamb ribs. Hold one end of the bone and let your dog chew on the other and pull away if it seems like your dog will try to swallow the whole thing! Through this process, much like a mother wolf might, you teach your dog how to patiently enjoy a bone.


Given enough time, your dog will eat the whole bone! If your dog eats too much bone however, their stools may come out chalky and hard or if the bone was too rich they may have loose stool. If you suspect they ate too much adding pumpkin to their meal will do the trick. To avoid eating too much bone, you can give it to them in several sittings so that they don’t eat the whole thing at once.

 

NO COOKED OR ROASTED BONES I can not stress this enough!

 

Cooked bones are dangerous as they become very hard and brittle which increases the likelihood of them breaking and splintering into sharp pieces. Cooked bones are also very difficult for dogs and cats to digest as the bones lose all of their nutritional value. Smoked Bones are also dangerous as they often have additives such as artificial flavouring and preservatives, so, the rule is, Raw, Raw, Raw and Raw.

 

Stomach Acidity PH Level

The gastric acidity (gastric PH) of the stomach of a dog or cat eating a diet predominantly made up of raw meat is very low (very acidic), with a PH of 1 or 2 (relative to the level of meat protein). This is it’s natural environment and changes with the amount of animal based protein i.e. Raw meat a dog gets, the more starches (plant based, grains, rice, potatoes etc) increases the PH gastric level to 4-5 or even higher, which is the reason so many dogs have sensitive stomachs, diarrhoea, vomiting, gastric obstructions etc. 

 

This highly acidic environment favours the breakdown of raw meats, and raw bones, into soft digestible material. The low PH also is highly effective at killing bacteria, particularly potentially pathogenic bacteria like salmonella spp, clostridia, campylobacter and E Coli. So the natural ‘wild” diet of dogs an cats has evolved a gastric environment that favours the breakdown of raw meats, raw bones, and a PH that kills potentially harmful bacteria, consistent with the requirements of carnivores, and in particular, the scavenging nature of dogs.

 

Digestive Tract

Also matched to this highly carnivorous diet (raw meat diet) is a very effective digestive process, which occurs in a short gastrointestinal tract. Dogs and cats have a significantly shorter GI tract compared to other non meat eating (herbivorous) animals, whereas man, as a natural omnivore has an intermediate length. The relative length of the gut reflects that nature of the diet, and how efficiently or slowly the food is broken down and absorbed.

 

Fresh raw meat is easily digested and absorbed compared to vegetable matter, and as such, carnivores have a short gut, and rapid gut transit time, fresh meat can be digested and processed in the carnivores body in as little as 8- 12 hrs, whereas plant and vegetable material in a herbivore’s gut can take 3-5 days to be processed.

 

What we see with the advent of processed pet foods, is a significant change in the general nature of ingredients in the diet. It is a simple commercial fact that meat protein is the most expensive component in any pet food, and as a result, there is always commercial pressure to keep meat protein levels to a minimum, thereby keeping costs down of the end product (and / or maximising profits).

 

Modern processed pet foods have adapted to these financial constraints firstly by significantly increasing the carbohydrate component of dog and cat foods – corn, wheat, rice, potato, pea fibre, beet fibre and other forms of carbohydrate are often the first and most major ingredient in many pet foods. Secondly, processed pet foods have also begun to substitute meat (animal) proteins with plant based proteins that are much cheaper – ingredients like Soya bean and lupins are cheap sources of protein that will increase the overall protein % on the label, but without the associated increase in cost. The problem with this type of substitution is that it does directly impact on the digestive environment of the dog or cat.

 

Feeding Bone, The Facts

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